Sports Eye Safety

Posted by on Sep 5, 2017 in Eye Injuries, Sports Eyewear, Uncategorized

September is Sports Eye Safety Month. According to Prevent Blindness America, over 25,000 people seek treatment for sports-related eye injuries each year! These injuries can be preventable with the proper eye protection.

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Amniotic Membranes to Treat Corneal Trauma and Disease

Posted by on Jul 27, 2017 in Acid Burns, Alkali Burns, Amniotic membrane, Chemical Burn, Cornea, Eye Diseases, Eye Injuries, Homepage

Amniotic Membranes to Treat Corneal Trauma and Disease

Most people recognize the term amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is the fluid surrounding a fetus while in the womb during pregnancy. For over a hundred years, scientists have been aware of the healing properties existent within this fluid; however, it is only within the past few years that these healing properties have been made available to help treat ocular conditions in the form of sutureless amniotic membranes.

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Fireworks Safety

Posted by on Jun 29, 2013 in Children's Eye Injuries, Eye Emergency, Eye Injuries, Featured, Fireworks Safety, home, Homepage, Uncategorized

Every Fourth of July, people around the country gather together to enjoy fireworks.  Unfortunately, many people end up in the emergency room being treated for fireworks-related injuries.  According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission: More than 9,000 fireworks-related injuries occur each year. One-fourth of fireworks eye injuries result in permanent vision loss or blindness. For children under the age of five, sparklers account for one-third of all fireworks injuries.  (Sparklers can get hot enough to cause a third-degree burn.) The best way to prevent fireworks-related injuries is to leave the lighting of fireworks to trained professionals.   If you still choose to light fireworks yourself this year, make sure to follow some important tips for eye safety. Wear safety goggles if you are lighting fireworks. Don’t let children light fireworks and use caution with sparklers. Make sure bystanders are  a safe distance away.  Many children suffer injuries from being near a parent lighting fireworks. If you get an eye injury from fireworks, seek medical help immediately. Hope everyone has a safe and happy Fourth of July!...

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May is UV Awareness Month

Posted by on May 4, 2013 in Cataract, Child's Eyewear, Children’s Sunglasses, Corneal Sunburn, Costa Sunglasses, Damaging UV Rays, Eye Injuries, Homepage, Sunglasses, Sunglasses for Kids, Uncategorized, UV Protective Sunglasses, UV Rays, UV Safety Month, UVA Rays, UVB Rays

Protect your Eyes from the Sun’s Damaging Rays             As summer approaches, everyone will begin to spend more time outdoors.  Most people are aware of the damaging effects the sun can have on the skin leading to sunburn and eventually skin cancer; however, not all realize the harmful effects the sun can have on the eyes.              Ultraviolet rays from the sun are thought to contribute to several different eye conditions, some of which can significantly impact vision.  This risk has led Prevent Blindness America to proclaim May as Ultraviolet Awareness month, in order to provide the public with more information on the importance of sun protection for the eyes.  Some of the more common eye diseases thought to be associated with ultraviolet rays include: Photokeratitis:  Photokeratitis, or UV keratitis, is essentially a sunburn of the cornea, the clear outer covering of the eye.  Photokeratitis is primarily caused by short-term UV exposure; for example, several hours at the beach without sunglasses or a hat, failing to wear protective eye goggles in a tanning bed, or welding without a proper shield.  Although photokeratitis tends to improve within a few days, it can be very painful and can cause temporary blurring of the vision.  Skin Cancer around the eyelids:  The eyelid tissue surrounding the eyes is very thin and is especially vulnerable to damage from UV rays.  Basal cell carcinoma is the most common type of skin cancer to affect the eyelids.  Squamous cell carcinoma, sebaceous gland carcinoma, and melanoma can also grow on the eyelids.  Pinguecula/Pterygium:  Pinguecula and pterygium are both common conditions that affect the conjunctiva, the white area on the front surface of the eyes.  Pinguecula, the more common of the two, is an overgrowth of the conjunctiva, forming a yellowish raised area on the white area of the eyes.  Pinguecula can cause mild irritation and dryness.  Pterygium is more severe and causes an overgrowth of the conjunctiva onto the cornea, thereby decreasing vision, causing an uncomfortable foreign body sensation, and significantly affecting cosmesis, or the appearance of the eyes.  Both pinguecula and pterygium are caused by sun exposure and tend to increase in prevalence with proximity to the equator.  Cataracts:  Cataracts are the leading cause of blindness worldwide. According to the National Eye Institute, 20.5 million Americans over the age of 40 have cataracts.  Several studies have linked the formation of cataracts with long-term sun exposure.  A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye, causing gradual decreased vision and increased difficulty with glare, especially at night.  Once cataracts are formed, surgery is required to remove the cataracts and improve vision.  Macular Degeneration:  Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), another leading cause of blindness, is also thought to be related to long-term damage from UV rays.  Macular degeneration affects the macula, the central part of the retina responsible for the central part of vision.  Because macular degeneration affects the central vision, it significantly impacts the ability to perform many normal daily activities, including driving, reading, and even watching TV or seeing faces.  What can I do to protect my eyes? Ultraviolet rays emitted by the sun consist of...

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Protect your Eyes: Workplace Eye Wellness Month

Posted by on Mar 26, 2013 in Chemical Burn, Eye Emergencies, Eye Injuries, Homepage, Uncategorized

March is Workplace Eye Wellness Month   According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, there are around 25,000 eye injuries each year that require time away from work.  In addition to being painful, many eye injuries can result in permanent loss of vision.  Unfortunately, we see many patients each month in our office who have experienced eye injuries while at work or home.  Common eye injuries include chemical, thermal or UV burns, foreign bodies in the eye, and corneal abrasions.  Fortunately, 90% of eye injuries are preventable with proper eye protection.    It is important to recognize potential eye health hazards in the workplace and to be prepared with the proper eye protection.  Common eye health hazards include projectiles (such as particles from dust, wood, metal, glass, etc.), chemicals, radiation, and blood-borne pathogens.  The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires the use of eye and face protection whenever there is a “reasonable probability of injury that could be prevented by such equipment”.  The type of protective eyewear required varies upon the task, the equipment being used, and the individual’s needs.   Remember to never remove your eye safety protection until you are well out of harm’s way.  Many injuries that we see occur when an individual has finished their task but is still near others who are working.  Any individual who is in the general vicinity may become a victim of an eye injury if not properly protected.         Prevent Blindness America provides programs for employers to train their employees on proper eye protection and help safeguard them from injuries.   For more information on this program as well as additional information on protecting your eyes in the workplace, click here http://www.preventblindness.org/eye-safety-work.   If you have experienced an eye injury at work or at home, call our office to schedule an emergency appointment (850)683-0221.  ...

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Using Colored Lenses for Halloween

Posted by on Oct 25, 2012 in Blindness, Blog, Child's Eyewear, Children's Eye Injuries, Colored Lenses, Comprehensive Eye Exam, Contact Lenses, Contacts, Corneal Abraisons, Eye Care Professional, Eye Conditions, Eye Diseases, Eye Emergencies, Eye Emergency, Eye Exam, Eye Injuries, Eye Injury, Eye Irritants, Featured, Halloween, Homepage, Itchy Eye, October, October: Eye Injury Prevention Month

Countdown to Halloween: 6 Days!! Have you decided what you’re going to be for Halloween, yet? Here is a list of this year’s top 5 Halloween costumes. Top Adult Costumes Top Children’s Costumes Top Pet Costumes 1. Witch 1. Princess 1. Pumpkin 2. Vampire 2. Batman 2. Devil 3. Pirate 3. Spiderman 3. Hot Dog 4. Batman Character 4. Witch 4. Cat 5. Zombie 5. Disney Princess 5. Bee One of the absolute coolest and most unique ways to change your appearance for Halloween is to change your eye color. We’ve all seen movie stars with dark brown eyes in one movie and bright blue eyes in another. These colored lenses are nothing new, but as of late, it is an increasing trend that has become really popular.   And while we all want to do something cool for Halloween, there are some inherent dangers to wearing colored lenses. Keep in mind that these lenses only change your eye color and DO NOT correct your vision. So if you rely solely on contact lenses for your vision, then these lenses are probably a no-go for you. Also, since any lens that you put into your eyes are considered ‘medical devices’, you should get these directly from your optometrist. It is not safe to buy these from a halloween store, a beauty supply store and especially from a street vendor. Keep in mind – these are not made in the cleanest of conditions. Your eye care professional will look at your eyes and give you a prescription for them. The reason for this is your eye shape is different from everyone else’s eye shape. If you wear contact lenses now, you know that the lenses has a prescription and a ‘curvature’ to it. This curvature uniquely fits your eyes. “What do I need to know before wearing these colored lenses?” ANYTHING used not as intended can have consequences. So why chance it with your eyesight? Here are some of the risks: A cut or scratch on the top layer of your eyeball (Corneal Abrasion) Allergic reactions like itchy, watery red eyes Decreased vision Infection Blindness “Nah, I’m good. I’ll just order mine from a magazine.” Great! So we’ll be seeing you here in a couple of days for some type of eye infection!!! Seriously, should you have any irritation, cuts, infections or discharge, you need to hoof it on over to see us. Our  optometrist can stop the infection before it becomes too serious. You can avoid some of these risks by getting any type of contact lenses from your doctor. Be sure to follow the directions for cleaning, disinfecting, and wearing the lenses that your doctor gives you. If your doctor doesn’t give you any directions — ask for them! “Ok, ok – I’ll come in. What do I need to do?” One: Come in and Get an Exam. We need to make sure the contact lenses fit properly. A wrong fit can cause damage to your eyes. Two: Get a Prescription. Our optometrists will write you a prescription for all contact lenses. This includes decorative lenses. Three: Follow...

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